CLAT’17: The Expert Analysis

While CLAT’17 came as a smooth ride for most of the aspirants, aspirants indeed faced some major bumps during  the ride. We think that this year’s CLAT was slightly difficult than last year’s CLAT however it was easier than CLAT 2015 (that nightmare!). Most of the aspirants found this paper rather lengthy especially the Maths section unlike last year’s CLAT. CNLU decided to surprise all of us with the most unpredictable GK Section. While the English and Logical Reasoning sections were easy to solve, the Legal Reasoning section came out to be the easiest of all. We have prepared three categories of sectional scores which will give a better analysis of your standing in the ever-growing merit list. Continue reading

A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!

Akash Deep Singh (AILET AIR 1) explains the enigma of Post-Mock Analysis

I am quite sure all of you would have heard this innumerable times from an uncountable number of people (exaggeration is not always a bad idea :P) that giving mocks is the best way to practice for CLAT. LawKey itself has been telling you the same thing. If I haven’t made it clear already, I am also a part of the same bandwagon and believe that mocks are the best practice you can get. Most of you have taken this advice seriously and are giving one mock a day. Continue reading

AILET’17: The Expert Analysis

AILET aspirants across the nation felt the same about yesterday’s paper. “It was too lengthy.” said one AILET aspirant coming out of her AILET centre, here at NLSIU, Bangalore. Overall, the paper was of a moderate-difficult difficulty level according to our analysis, with the logical reasoning section playing a major role in enhancing its difficulty level. An overall cutoff of 93-97 is expected to get aspirants into the NLU standing tall in the nation’s capital. Let us analyse the paper in detail now. Continue reading

Mock Tests: Know How (Part 1)

CLAT Mentorship Programme and Mock Test SeriesWhen was the last time you felt like taking a mock test? Sometimes you just don’t feel like giving any. You tend to ask existential questions, why is life doing this to me? In which hellish moment did I pick law? And even if I did, why do these people want me to take a test? I am not prepared at all. I haven’t read January Current Affairs or haven’t practiced blood relations. I am so dead. I won’t make it to a good law school now. Trust me, it’s completely natural.

This is part of what happens during any CLAT prep and you are no anomaly to it. Now, I will explain to you, why this fear is fake and not relevant. Being at law school, I’ll give you the reasonable man’s test. Try and think of any mock test which you happened to be satisfied with either in your preparation or your performance and did not think of getting that 1 or 2 marks more after you saw the result. Can’t think of any? Because there’s no such thing. Even the guy who has been the rank 1 at your coaching center for ages won’t be content. Trust me, even I wasn’t. There’s always this one nagging question that couldn’t be solved and if there’s a friend who did it right while you couldn’t do so, it’s even more problematic.

When this gets stuck in your mind all that it leads to is unnecessary stress. Stress isn’t good for your health or your marks. It translates into bad time management or ends up messing with one section or other which at times can cost you the whole mock test, forget the actual exam, where you are already at peak stress level. What now? Leave alone the prep you couldn’t do, you wasted the prep you did as well. So what do you do?

There’s this economics professor at NLS who told me something that stuck in my mind -“Just do it Ashim, do it.” Exactly what you guys got to do. You will never be satisfied with whatever your preparation is. So just write it and let it be. Treat yourself if you think you scored even marginally better than your last mock. Work towards rectifying your errors and not losing out on any opportunity to grow and be better. Every mock is a milestone towards making your prep finer and better. It is the stepping stone to a better law school and a better life. Never avoid them, cadet, never.

Ashim Gupta

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CLATathon

So I was asked by these wacky friends of mine to write something to inspire young kids to take up CLAT sans all the scary nightmares. So here it goes my pals. Somewhere in this write up I have hidden the magic recipe to crack CLAT. Firstly let’s start with how to tackle the highly unpredictable, hell of an exam called CLAT. The answer is a quote from somewhere in the internet. “Do not just practice until you get it right, practice until you cannot get it wrong.” Yes, be prepared! Remember that the exam is an experience of bureaucratic slack, and do not stick only to mocks of one coaching centre. Read books from varied sources. Be ready for anything they are scheming to throw at you.

CLAT is an easy exam and to crack it all you need is a plan. If you fail to plan you plan to fail. Complete the basics and start to practice. Beginning with GK I would kill the person who sits with some random UPSC book. Come on folks, it’s CLAT! All you need to do is get a decent static GK book, finish it and you are done. For current affairs get a few good current affairs magazines, read (good) newspapers and subscribe to a good weekly magazine! Same goes for maths. Its CLAT, not CAT. I would hence suggest you to first get the exam right. Finish the basic topics in maths and practice until you lose the phobia of it and here you have 20 marks in your pocket. For English you need not be a son of a British. All you need to do is first get your grammar right-not for CLAT but for life. Same goes for vocabulary. Intimidate your friends by using sassy words in your life. Logic, whoa! If you claim to be bad at it you are insulting yourself. Okay, the only way to improve your reasoning is practice (huh! cliché again?). I know people who practice the same stuff all the time. Logical Reasoning in CLAT is not comprised of only syllogism and coding decoding. Practice a range of different problems. Remember that logic in CLAT has verbal and nonverbal components and practice for both. Practice some past LSAT papers and your verbal reasoning is done. And finally LEGAL! You have five years of law ahead, do not over dose. Go slow, memorize some rules (principles) and  practice, practice and practice.

PS: Do not panic. We all have been through it. In the end, it is this that makes NLS worth being in.

All the Best.

Avinash V Rao

Follow us and ensure that you do not miss a single post. Like our Facebook Page as well and help us grow. If you have any specific doubts, message us on Facebook or write to us at lawkeyforclat@gmail.com. To ace your CLAT prep and increase your chances of getting into the top 3 NLUs, click here.