Posted in English, Study Material

Taming the Shrew: Attempting Reading Comprehension

In this article, Akash Deep Singh explains how to attempt reading comprehensions

One of the most common fear of most CLAT aspirants is the Reading-Comprehension(RC) question present in the paper. The innate resistance to this particular type of question is so large that many of you refuse to even attempt it. The usual laments being it takes too long to complete it, it’s highly subjective in nature and hence, it’s not worth the time or effort. You neglect it till the end and try to complete it in whatever time is left. This is a cardinal error that must be avoided at all costs. CLAT always has an RC question. It might be worth anything from 5-10 marks. And you cannot afford to neglect it.

Another common complaint which I have come across is it’s become difficult to attempt RC as its online now (for all we know, it might not stay so anymore but that’s not up to you). Test-takers not being able to mark the important portions of the passage anymore is a common problem. What needs to be remembered is that this is true for everyone. Being able to mark the important portions was just a helpful tool. The most important thing then and even now is to understand the underlying idea of the passage.

CLAT has never given hard RCs. The ideal time in which an RC question should be completed is 7-8 minutes. To do this, it is near-essential that you have a fast reading speed. We have already published an article on that. Please follow the suggestions given there as they will help you immeasurably not only in RC or English but through the whole paper.

Different people have different ways to attempt and ace this question. It’s up to you to practice them all out and find the sweet spot. You can employ the method I’ve given below or some modification of the same as per your convenience. So here goes:

 Take a minute to read the first few lines of each para in the passage to understand the gist of it. You will need to completely read the first para and also the concluding lines of the passage. Now read the questions, not the options, only the questions. This will give you an idea of what you are looking for in the passage. If there are too many questions, then only read the first few. Otherwise there’s a chance you might get muddled up. Go back to the passage and take 3-4 minutes to read it completely. You must have gotten the gist of it by now. This is when start attempting the questions. If you were not able to read all of the questions, you can now attempt them as you have already read the passage. You will have to refer to the passage again and again but if you have gotten the gist of it, then this back and forth becomes negligible. Another way to go about it is to first read the questions and then the passage. This gives you a hint of what you need to be on the lookout for.

Please bear in mind that none of the suggestions given above might suit you. But you can only find this out by attempting as many RC questions as possible and trying out the above strategy (or any other you may have stumbled upon in the course of your preparation) to figure out what best suits you.

-Akash Deep Singh

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Posted in Mathematics, Study Material

Averages: A Complete Guide

Averages is an extremely important section for CLAT. Most of you have already completed this topic as it is one of the easiest topics in Maths. However, there still might be some people who have not done it. I expect this article to be useful for both the groups.

Almost every one of us is quite familiar with this primary class formula for determining Average, i.e. Sum of quantities / Number of quantities. But to use this formula you need a pen and a paper. Jotting down the numbers given in the question and then trying to solve them will unnecessarily take up your time. Therefore, in this article, I’ll try to explain how to solve most of the questions related to averages asked in CLAT (there still will be some questions which will require a pen and a paper) without using pen and paper or the above-given formula and save your ‘precious’ time. So, let us start:

While solving questions on averages, keep one thing in mind, i.e. assume the average of quantities as quantities in possession of equal points. For example, if it is given that average of 10 quantities is 15, assume that there are 10 people/things each having 15 points in its possession. Now, let us move forward by solving some examples –

Q.1. A batsman scores of 87 runs in the 17th match and thus increases his average by 3. Find his average after 17th match.

Sol. As mentioned earlier, assume 17 matches as seventeen people with equal runs, i.e. average. Now, by scoring 87 runs in 17th match, he increased his average by 3. So, 3 runs flow from the 17th person to all other 16 persons, i.e. a total of 16*3=48 runs from 17th person to other persons. Now, 17th person has 87-48=39 runs which is the average.

 

Q.2. Average weight of 10 people increased by 1.5 kg when one person of 45 kg is replaced by a new man. What is the weight of this new man?

Sol. One thing is clear from the question that the weight of the new person is more than 45 kg as his entry increases the average weight. Also, if the average, i.e. equal points of every person, increases it must flow from the new person. Now,the total extra weight that this man has brought with him is 1.5*10=15 kg. So,the weight of this new person is 15+45 = 60 kg.

 

Q.3. Average of five numbers is 27. If one number is excluded the average becomes 25. Find the excluded number.

Sol. Since exclusion of one number leads to a reduction in average, the number must be greater than the average, i.e. 27. Extra quantity this number takes away with it is 2 from each of the remaining four numbers as the average after exclusion is 25. So, total extra quantity taken away is 2*4=8. Hence, the number which was excluded is 8+27 = 35.

 

Q.4. Average of 10 matches is 32. How many runs should one score to increase his average by 4 runs?

Sol. To increase the average by 4, i.e. to make it 36, one should score (36 + 4*10) = 76 runs. Here, by scoring 76 runs in 11th match, one can give away 4 each to each of 10 other matches thereby increasing the average of 10 other matches to 36 and keeping 76-40= 36 for the 11th match.

 

Q.5. The average age of the mother and her six children is 12 years which is reduced by 5 years if the age of the mother is excluded. How old is the mother?

Sol. Before mother’s exclusion, the average age is 12 years. Mother’s exclusion takes away 5*6=30 years from the children. So, the age of the mother is 12+30= 42 years.

 

CLAT questions are generally similar to the above-given examples which can be quite easily solved without using any formula or pen-paper. Other types of questions, where you will be given numbers and asked to compute the average, it can be done by using the formula –

Sum of Quantities / Number of Quantities

For natural numbers, the average of n natural numbers is given by: (n+1)/2. (As sum of n natural numbers is n (n+1)/2).

Anil Bhadu

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Posted in English, Study Material

Cracking The Vocabulary Section

Vocabulary is a nightmare for most people as the English language seems to have an infinitely large number of words and seems to throw new ones at you every now and then. So, in this small write-up, I have attempted to give you a few tips which would help you ace the vocabulary section.

First and foremost, you should buy a decent book on English vocabulary and start going through it at the rate of about three pages a day. Yes, it might seem a bit intimidating at first, but you have to sweat it out. Underline the words that you didn’t know existed and try and use them in your day-to-day conversations in the right context. By the end of the month you should have ideally completed the book, and believe me you will start making more sense of the literary world around you, you will understand more of what the erudite journalist in “The Hindu” is trying to express and the world will seem so much better. Continue reading “Cracking The Vocabulary Section”

Posted in Logical Reasoning

Tackling Assumption Questions

“Assumptions are dangerous things to make, and like all dangerous things to make, if you make even the tiniest mistake you can find yourself in terrible trouble.”

This quote is in itself true to a large extent, but, when it comes to the critical reasoning section of the CLAT and other law entrance examinations, you should consider it to be the Gospel truth. You are most likely to find Assumption Questions in the form of a short paragraph followed by four assumptions, with you having to choose the assumption which is essential to make in order to reach the conclusion arrived at in the passage. They appear occasionally in the CLAT and are a regular in the AILET.

Continue reading “Tackling Assumption Questions”

Posted in Get Inspired, Motivation, Study Material

CLAT: Your Wonderwall

I’m sure most of you must have heard Wonderwall by Oasis. Yes, it’s a popular song, but what does it have to do with CLAT? ‘Wonderwall’ means “the person you constantly find yourself thinking about”. And I’m going to tell you why CLAT should be your wonderwall.

Today is gonna be the day
That they’re gonna throw it back to you

There’s less than three months for the D-Day. Haven’t started preparing yet? Today is the day to start. Continue reading “CLAT: Your Wonderwall”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Balance Boards and CLAT!

Boards or CLAT? Both important, both time consuming – what and how much of it to study? Yes, it is that daunting time of CLAT preparation when your prep routine is falling apart, your focus is divided and you don’t know from where, when, why and WHAT to study – for Boards or for CLAT? It’s okay, relax, many of us have been there, done that, and successfully pulled off both Boards and CLAT. It needs a bit more hard work and dedication, but is definitely doable. And trust us, if we can do it, you can too! Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Balance Boards and CLAT!”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.

Ah yes, it’s that time of the year! It’s unbelievably satisfying to watch students struggle through the next few months with the burden of CLAT coupled with the additional burden of the Boards. Anyway, since sadistic pleasure is not the point of this article, let me move on to its main purpose.

It is around end-Feb as I’m writing this and if your CLAT preparation is in full swing, then that’s great. If not, you might want to start soon and with a bit of intensive preparation, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t crack it. As you’d know (and if you don’t, you probably should), the CLAT paper is divided into five sections consisting of English, General Knowledge, Math, Legal Reasoning and Logical Reasoning. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.”

Posted in Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.

First and foremost question before we get into details……. Are seating arrangement questions important for CLAT?

To this, the answer is a big ‘YES’.

In CLAT, reasoning is an extremely important section as it makes up twenty percent of the marks. But, it’s real importance lies in the fact that it’s extremely scoring. Amongst the myriad reasoning questions, seating arrangement questions are high scoring and less time consuming ones. Less time consuming as you will find three to five questions based on the same set of problem. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: The ideal strategy!

Of the many ‘CLAT preparation period’ images that float in the retina of my mind’s eye there are some that make a blink and miss ephemeral appearance while there are others that linger on….and on…! In the latter category two take the place of honor. The first is the bated breath wait for the online mocks scores. This is not to be scoffed since I gave close to 70 mocks and many a times was in danger of asphyxiating!! The second image is of mum’s face. From being a normal motherly face with love, exasperation, pride, irritation all juxtaposed, it had turned into one that yo-yoed between (i) I think you are not pulling your weight enough but I am still going to be a ‘cool’ mom and not say anything even if it kills me Continue reading “Bust CLAT: The ideal strategy!”