Posted in Free Stuff, Free Take Aways, Study Material

Weekly Quiz 02: Legal Aptitude

The subject of the week was Legal Aptitude. Here is a quiz on the same. The quiz contains 10 questions. There is no negative marking. You can attempt the same here.

Please share the link with as many friends as possible. It helps you get a better idea of your standing in CLAT across the nation.

All the best!

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Posted in English, Free Stuff, Free Take Aways, Study Material, Uncategorized

Weekly Quiz: English 01

The subject of the week was English. An English Quiz has been posted this Sunday. You can attempt the same here. The results of the quiz shall be released on Monday. The quiz consists of 10 questions from the topic Synonyms, Antonyms, Foreign Words, Idioms and Phrases.

Click here. to attempt the quiz.

Posted in Mathematics, Study Material

Averages: A Complete Guide

Averages is an extremely important section for CLAT. Most of you have already completed this topic as it is one of the easiest topics in Maths. However, there still might be some people who have not done it. I expect this article to be useful for both the groups.

Almost every one of us is quite familiar with this primary class formula for determining Average, i.e. Sum of quantities / Number of quantities. But to use this formula you need a pen and a paper. Jotting down the numbers given in the question and then trying to solve them will unnecessarily take up your time. Therefore, in this article, I’ll try to explain how to solve most of the questions related to averages asked in CLAT (there still will be some questions which will require a pen and a paper) without using pen and paper or the above-given formula and save your ‘precious’ time. So, let us start:

While solving questions on averages, keep one thing in mind, i.e. assume the average of quantities as quantities in possession of equal points. For example, if it is given that average of 10 quantities is 15, assume that there are 10 people/things each having 15 points in its possession. Now, let us move forward by solving some examples –

Q.1. A batsman scores of 87 runs in the 17th match and thus increases his average by 3. Find his average after 17th match.

Sol. As mentioned earlier, assume 17 matches as seventeen people with equal runs, i.e. average. Now, by scoring 87 runs in 17th match, he increased his average by 3. So, 3 runs flow from the 17th person to all other 16 persons, i.e. a total of 16*3=48 runs from 17th person to other persons. Now, 17th person has 87-48=39 runs which is the average.

 

Q.2. Average weight of 10 people increased by 1.5 kg when one person of 45 kg is replaced by a new man. What is the weight of this new man?

Sol. One thing is clear from the question that the weight of the new person is more than 45 kg as his entry increases the average weight. Also, if the average, i.e. equal points of every person, increases it must flow from the new person. Now,the total extra weight that this man has brought with him is 1.5*10=15 kg. So,the weight of this new person is 15+45 = 60 kg.

 

Q.3. Average of five numbers is 27. If one number is excluded the average becomes 25. Find the excluded number.

Sol. Since exclusion of one number leads to a reduction in average, the number must be greater than the average, i.e. 27. Extra quantity this number takes away with it is 2 from each of the remaining four numbers as the average after exclusion is 25. So, total extra quantity taken away is 2*4=8. Hence, the number which was excluded is 8+27 = 35.

 

Q.4. Average of 10 matches is 32. How many runs should one score to increase his average by 4 runs?

Sol. To increase the average by 4, i.e. to make it 36, one should score (36 + 4*10) = 76 runs. Here, by scoring 76 runs in 11th match, one can give away 4 each to each of 10 other matches thereby increasing the average of 10 other matches to 36 and keeping 76-40= 36 for the 11th match.

 

Q.5. The average age of the mother and her six children is 12 years which is reduced by 5 years if the age of the mother is excluded. How old is the mother?

Sol. Before mother’s exclusion, the average age is 12 years. Mother’s exclusion takes away 5*6=30 years from the children. So, the age of the mother is 12+30= 42 years.

 

CLAT questions are generally similar to the above-given examples which can be quite easily solved without using any formula or pen-paper. Other types of questions, where you will be given numbers and asked to compute the average, it can be done by using the formula –

Sum of Quantities / Number of Quantities

For natural numbers, the average of n natural numbers is given by: (n+1)/2. (As sum of n natural numbers is n (n+1)/2).

Anil Bhadu

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Posted in Get Inspired, Motivation, Study Material

CLAT: Your Wonderwall

I’m sure most of you must have heard Wonderwall by Oasis. Yes, it’s a popular song, but what does it have to do with CLAT? ‘Wonderwall’ means “the person you constantly find yourself thinking about”. And I’m going to tell you why CLAT should be your wonderwall.

Today is gonna be the day
That they’re gonna throw it back to you

There’s less than three months for the D-Day. Haven’t started preparing yet? Today is the day to start. Continue reading “CLAT: Your Wonderwall”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.

Ah yes, it’s that time of the year! It’s unbelievably satisfying to watch students struggle through the next few months with the burden of CLAT coupled with the additional burden of the Boards. Anyway, since sadistic pleasure is not the point of this article, let me move on to its main purpose.

It is around end-Feb as I’m writing this and if your CLAT preparation is in full swing, then that’s great. If not, you might want to start soon and with a bit of intensive preparation, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t crack it. As you’d know (and if you don’t, you probably should), the CLAT paper is divided into five sections consisting of English, General Knowledge, Math, Legal Reasoning and Logical Reasoning. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.”

Posted in Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.

First and foremost question before we get into details……. Are seating arrangement questions important for CLAT?

To this, the answer is a big ‘YES’.

In CLAT, reasoning is an extremely important section as it makes up twenty percent of the marks. But, it’s real importance lies in the fact that it’s extremely scoring. Amongst the myriad reasoning questions, seating arrangement questions are high scoring and less time consuming ones. Less time consuming as you will find three to five questions based on the same set of problem. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: The Dropper’s to do list.

So, here you are with less than 90 days left for CLAT. As droppers, you might have experienced what it feels like to go through the rank list and not find your name where you wanted it to be. But you have taken a brave decision to try once again, to give it another shot and prove to yourself that you are capable of getting through to one of the top law schools in the country.

First of all, during this crucial period get rid of those friends who are chilling in their college, no kidding. It will have a detrimental effect because you’ll have to labour through the next few months while they tell you all kinds of stories about their amazing life. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: The Dropper’s to do list.”