Posted in English, Free Stuff, Free Take Aways, Study Material, Uncategorized

Weekly Quiz: English 01

The subject of the week was English. An English Quiz has been posted this Sunday. You can attempt the same here. The results of the quiz shall be released on Monday. The quiz consists of 10 questions from the topic Synonyms, Antonyms, Foreign Words, Idioms and Phrases.

Click here. to attempt the quiz.

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Posted in CLAT Mock Test Series, Mock Tests

A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!

Akash Deep Singh (AILET AIR 1) explains the enigma of Post-Mock Analysis

I am quite sure all of you would have heard this innumerable times from an uncountable number of people (exaggeration is not always a bad idea :P) that giving mocks is the best way to practice for CLAT. LawKey itself has been telling you the same thing. If I haven’t made it clear already, I am also a part of the same bandwagon and believe that mocks are the best practice you can get. Most of you have taken this advice seriously and are giving one mock a day. Continue reading “A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!”

Posted in Get Inspired, Motivation

Life Apart From CLAT

Abhiroop Saha explains why it is important to have a Life Apart From CLAT!

Interactions with a couple of my batch mates and current CLAT aspirants have been the inspiration behind this article. The main problem juniors face during preparation is that of managing both CLAT and Boards. Several articles give tips on how to balance both. Sadly, what is lost in between is time for doing things one enjoys. People leave sports, music and other such leisurely activities all for the sake of CLAT. One of my batch mates, once a national level football player stopped playing because of the dual problem of CLAT and boards. The same happened to another batch mate of mine, a classical guitarist who has hardly played in the last two years.

Many of you might think that you will reclaim your hobbies once you end up in college and that you would be better off focusing on cracking CLAT at the moment. The former is a massive delusional bubble that will burst the moment you start getting to know what college is all about. I’ll be very honest and break it to you right now. College does not give a damn about your extra-curricular activities. It places you in a choke hold and leaves you with time only for projects, studies and the odd you-tube video.

Secondly, cracking CLAT and carrying forward extra-curricular activities need not be mutually exclusive. In my opinion, the best thing about CLAT is that it is easy, at least in comparison to IIT JEE or the numerous medical entrances. You don’t need to spend nine-ten hours a day to crack CLAT, unlike the JEE. Most of the exam is general and GK can be managed with some diligent old school by-hearting. The competition level is also much lesser than that of the entrance examinations in other professions. It can be easily cleared with 4 hours of dedicated work every-day apart from giving mocks and attending classes (lesser in certain cases). Even if you feel you require a greater amount of effort, it is all right. The point being made here is CLAT is not a good enough reason to forgo the things you love doing. You can easily put in one-two hours of football practice, or drums, or just adda in general and still do exceedingly well in CLAT, like I have done (real humble, I am).

You need to realize that your life is not defined by a good CLAT rank (or lack, thereof). A good rank and a good college feel amazing but it is really not worth it, if it comes at the cost of losing yourself by virtue of losing the things you love doing. College is going to be harder than anything you’ve faced before and it will try to mess around with your life greatly. The least you can do is not give up before you have even gotten here. After reading this, I hope you put on your football boots or re-install FIFA 16, or just get to doing whatever you want to, whatever makes you feel alive. Do not let CLAT or boards (or the two combined) get the better of you. Take these things in your stride. Take them seriously, but never so much that they dictate your life. The next time you make a time table or the next time you think of balancing time, remember to keep aside sufficient time for things you like. Enjoy the last few months you have before college because once it starts, carrying forward your hobbies might not be your independent choice any more. I reiterate this once again: CLAT is not a good enough reason to forgo the things you love doing.

If you find this article extremely pretentious, you are right on track.

P.S- While I might have painted a sorry-nerdy figure of the two guys in the first paragraph, they are actually pretty cool and you’ll find that out if you end up in NLS.

P.P.S- Get back to your damn Competition Success Review.

Abhiroop Saha

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Posted in English, Study Material

Taming the Shrew: Attempting Reading Comprehension

In this article, Akash Deep Singh explains how to attempt reading comprehensions

One of the most common fear of most CLAT aspirants is the Reading-Comprehension(RC) question present in the paper. The innate resistance to this particular type of question is so large that many of you refuse to even attempt it. The usual laments being it takes too long to complete it, it’s highly subjective in nature and hence, it’s not worth the time or effort. You neglect it till the end and try to complete it in whatever time is left. This is a cardinal error that must be avoided at all costs. CLAT always has an RC question. It might be worth anything from 5-10 marks. And you cannot afford to neglect it.

Another common complaint which I have come across is it’s become difficult to attempt RC as its online now (for all we know, it might not stay so anymore but that’s not up to you). Test-takers not being able to mark the important portions of the passage anymore is a common problem. What needs to be remembered is that this is true for everyone. Being able to mark the important portions was just a helpful tool. The most important thing then and even now is to understand the underlying idea of the passage.

CLAT has never given hard RCs. The ideal time in which an RC question should be completed is 7-8 minutes. To do this, it is near-essential that you have a fast reading speed. We have already published an article on that. Please follow the suggestions given there as they will help you immeasurably not only in RC or English but through the whole paper.

Different people have different ways to attempt and ace this question. It’s up to you to practice them all out and find the sweet spot. You can employ the method I’ve given below or some modification of the same as per your convenience. So here goes:

 Take a minute to read the first few lines of each para in the passage to understand the gist of it. You will need to completely read the first para and also the concluding lines of the passage. Now read the questions, not the options, only the questions. This will give you an idea of what you are looking for in the passage. If there are too many questions, then only read the first few. Otherwise there’s a chance you might get muddled up. Go back to the passage and take 3-4 minutes to read it completely. You must have gotten the gist of it by now. This is when start attempting the questions. If you were not able to read all of the questions, you can now attempt them as you have already read the passage. You will have to refer to the passage again and again but if you have gotten the gist of it, then this back and forth becomes negligible. Another way to go about it is to first read the questions and then the passage. This gives you a hint of what you need to be on the lookout for.

Please bear in mind that none of the suggestions given above might suit you. But you can only find this out by attempting as many RC questions as possible and trying out the above strategy (or any other you may have stumbled upon in the course of your preparation) to figure out what best suits you.

-Akash Deep Singh

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Posted in English, Study Material

Cracking The Vocabulary Section

Vocabulary is a nightmare for most people as the English language seems to have an infinitely large number of words and seems to throw new ones at you every now and then. So, in this small write-up, I have attempted to give you a few tips which would help you ace the vocabulary section.

First and foremost, you should buy a decent book on English vocabulary and start going through it at the rate of about three pages a day. Yes, it might seem a bit intimidating at first, but you have to sweat it out. Underline the words that you didn’t know existed and try and use them in your day-to-day conversations in the right context. By the end of the month you should have ideally completed the book, and believe me you will start making more sense of the literary world around you, you will understand more of what the erudite journalist in “The Hindu” is trying to express and the world will seem so much better. Continue reading “Cracking The Vocabulary Section”

Posted in CLAT Mock Test Series, Mock Tests

A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!

Akash Deep Singh (AILET AIR 1) explains the enigma of Post-Mock Analysis

I am quite sure all of you would have heard this innumerable times from an uncountable number of people (exaggeration is not always a bad idea :P) that giving mocks is the best way to practice for CLAT. LawKey itself has been telling you the same thing. If I haven’t made it clear already, I am also a part of the same bandwagon and believe that mocks are the best practice you can get. Most of you have taken this advice seriously and are giving one mock a day. A mock a day is easy to manage and it leaves you with enough time to keep on working on your weaker subjects. But, please bear in mind you can cut down to 4-5 mocks a week, if it gets exhausting for you. Your mind needs to be fresh before you attempt any mock, otherwise it’s of no use. If you are still in class 12th and worried about not being able to practice mocks. STOP. Boards are the most important thing in your life right now and you have to pay complete attention to them. You can get back to CLAT when boards end, people at NLS and other NLUs have managed to crack CLAT while studying in 12th, you can do it too! You have been preparing for CLAT and as earlier articles on the page have already said believe in that preparation. This is true for any CLAT 2016 aspirant.

But as you have already noticed, this article isn’t (solely!) about keeping you guys motivated or exhorting you to do more mocks. It is about what to do after you have given a mock. Trust me, and more importantly my experience, when I say that analysis is more important than increasing the number of mocks you have attempted. A person who has practiced only 3-4 mocks a week but has analysed them to gauge his strength and weaknesses and has used the time available to him to work on them, has a much better chance of getting in than someone who gave 3 mocks a day but didn’t stop to analyse them.

It is after you have finished your mock when the real work starts. Mock analysis proceeds at two levels. The immediate one happens just after you have given the mock, which you should ideally do on the same day or the next day. The second approach is to be done with a homogenized set of mocks, by which I am referring to test series released by one single institute, and then analyze it in entirety. I will come back to the second approach later.

The immediate analysis entails looking at every question that you were not able to attempt or those questions you got wrong. Plan how you are going to address each one of them over the next few days. Analyse how much time you took per question. Is there a particular section that you are giving too much time to? Work on setting a time limit for each section and try to adhere to this time limit. Pay particular attention to the time taken by you on incorrect questions. Did you genuinely believe you could solve that question or were you stubborn enough to not move on? These are some of the things that you have to keep in mind while analysing your mocks.

The second approach, and I urge you to follow this at all costs, is to be done with a homogenized set of mocks. Coaching institutes who release these mocks provide you with an answer key unlike myriad other mocks that you will practice. This is an additional reason why the second approach to analyse your mocks must be followed. Also as it is online, you can observe the time taken by you in different questions. Most of the mocks in a test series are of the same level. The difficulty level sometimes goes up or down but that’s also to prepare you better. It’s CLAT, anything can happen. Take 3-4 of your past mocks and go through each of them section wise. You will notice that you are getting a certain type of question wrong again and again. Today’s the day when you will practice them till you get them right. Then move on to the questions which you were able to answer correctly. How much time did you take in them? Learn the tips and tricks to reduce this time. You are going through the paper to recognize the patterns present in your mocks and believe me, they are there. A particular type of question that you are always getting wrong, questions which you spend a lot of time on but do get it right, eventually.

Also you will have tried out different strategies in these mocks and this is an opportunity to check which one suits you. Use the most beneficial one in the next mock. It might not be the perfect one for you but you have time till March end to discover your perfect strategy. After that you have more or less decided on your approach and now you are working on fine-tuning it.

In the end I would like to reiterate, practicing a mock is doing half the job. Until you analyse your mocks, you are getting no benefit out of practicing so many mocks.

All the best.

Akash Deep Singh

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Posted in Logic, Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Reason Your Way Through CLAT

Dealing with the Logical Reasoning section

One thing I’ve often heard from people, who ask me for help with CLAT preparation, is that people with a science background have it easy when it comes to Logical Reasoning and Maths as they have ‘that bent of mind’ (but are woefully silent on what exactly they mean by that). I always try to dispel this misconception by giving them my example. I had humanities in school and I have always struggled with Maths, however, I have always been good at Logical Reasoning. So trust me when I say that you can make Logical Reasoning your strength no matter where you come from.

The Logical Reasoning section is fairly easy and can help you increase your score and boost your confidence. Since it accounts for one-fifth of the paper, it is advisable to devote around 25-30 minutes out of the two hours to this section. You should try and aim for thirty marks or more here which is not that difficult a target to achieve. According to me, there are three things any NLU-hopeful should keep in mind while attempting this section: speed, accuracy and the importance of reading the questions carefully.

Most of the questions in this section are in groups, based on the same problem, and therefore once you’ve solved the initial question in the group, it should not take you a lot of time to answer the consequent ones. Also to increase your speed without compromising on accuracy and efficiency, you can use certain techniques or quick tricks. One illustration of this could be EJOTY (5-10-15-20-25) which makes solving question based on alphabet series and coding-decoding easier and faster. You can either learn these tricks from some book, or study material, or create some on your own. Just make sure they are easy to remember and also to apply.

There is a huge variety of questions that can come in this section ranging from blood relations, coding-decoding, and syllogisms to critical reasoning. All of these require a lot of practice and clarity on the most efficient way of going about them. You only need to spend an hour or two each day on this section; practicing 6-7 questions of each type everyday should be more than sufficient to ensure that you perform well in this section. Daily practice will go a long way in helping you build your speed and increasing your accuracy.

One really important thing I noticed while looking at mock tests and CLAT papers was that the wording of the question is very important. Often people are in a hurry and do not read the questions carefully and thus lose out on precious marks. While answering questions based on syllogisms, it’s necessary to look at the options carefully and answer accordingly. This applies to other types of questions in this section as well.

All of this is, of course, my personal opinion, and there might be some people who disagree with me on the ‘ideal’ strategy for attempting the section, so feel free to make your own strategy. However, I cannot help but emphasise again on the need to build upon your speed and accuracy which is only possible through regular practice and a thorough understanding of the types of questions and their requirements. Apart from all this, all I can do is tell you that Logical Reasoning is quite scoring so don’t worry and just prepare well!

Aditi Gupta

Follow us and ensure that you do not miss a single post. Like our Facebook Page as well and help us grow. If you have any queries, message us on Facebook or write to us at lawkeyforclat@gmail.com. To increase your chances of making it to the top 3 NLUs through CLAT’17, click here

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.

Ah yes, it’s that time of the year! It’s unbelievably satisfying to watch students struggle through the next few months with the burden of CLAT coupled with the additional burden of the Boards. Anyway, since sadistic pleasure is not the point of this article, let me move on to its main purpose.

It is around end-Feb as I’m writing this and if your CLAT preparation is in full swing, then that’s great. If not, you might want to start soon and with a bit of intensive preparation, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t crack it. As you’d know (and if you don’t, you probably should), the CLAT paper is divided into five sections consisting of English, General Knowledge, Math, Legal Reasoning and Logical Reasoning. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.”

Posted in CLAT Mentorship, CLAT Mock Test Series, Study Material

CLAT Mentorship Programme

Hey all,

CLAT 2017 is done – the exam was conducted, the results are out, the colleges have been allotted. We were delighted to see that our students secured an excellent result. Arti Gupta, our mentee kid, secured AIR 8 in CLAT 2017. In addition to that, our students – Ananya H.S.  (AIR 11), Vishu Surana (AIR 13), Yusuf Tariq (AIR 23), Mohit Kumar (AIR 41) and Harshvardhan Tripathi (AILET AIR 3, CLAT AIR 118) – secured excellent ranks. We are fortunate to have had such an excellent result in only a few months of operation. It makes us believe that we have been helpful to you and your CLAT preparation. But CLAT 2017 is long gone now. It’s time to look ahead to CLAT 2018! Many of you are now at the same stage that we were a couple of years ago. The mental state you are in is something we can completely pressure, it is completely natural to feel this way during CLAT preparation. It is what prepares you for taking the exam. After all, keeping your cool is what CLAT is all about.

Continue reading “CLAT Mentorship Programme”