Posted in Free Stuff, Free Take Aways, Study Material

Weekly Quiz 02: Legal Aptitude

The subject of the week was Legal Aptitude. Here is a quiz on the same. The quiz contains 10 questions. There is no negative marking. You can attempt the same here.

Please share the link with as many friends as possible. It helps you get a better idea of your standing in CLAT across the nation.

All the best!

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Posted in Free Stuff, Free Take Aways, general knowledge, Study Material

GK Factsheet: Week 02: July 2017

Here’s our Current Affairs Factsheet for the second week of July 2017 i.e. July 15-23, 2017. This factsheet has all the RELEVANT FACTS from July 15-23, 2017 that a CLAT aspirant should know. It was prepared by Chitwan Sharma (NLSIU Batch of 2020). Continue reading “GK Factsheet: Week 02: July 2017”

Posted in Mathematics, Study Material

Averages: A Complete Guide

Averages is an extremely important section for CLAT. Most of you have already completed this topic as it is one of the easiest topics in Maths. However, there still might be some people who have not done it. I expect this article to be useful for both the groups.

Almost every one of us is quite familiar with this primary class formula for determining Average, i.e. Sum of quantities / Number of quantities. But to use this formula you need a pen and a paper. Jotting down the numbers given in the question and then trying to solve them will unnecessarily take up your time. Therefore, in this article, I’ll try to explain how to solve most of the questions related to averages asked in CLAT (there still will be some questions which will require a pen and a paper) without using pen and paper or the above-given formula and save your ‘precious’ time. So, let us start:

While solving questions on averages, keep one thing in mind, i.e. assume the average of quantities as quantities in possession of equal points. For example, if it is given that average of 10 quantities is 15, assume that there are 10 people/things each having 15 points in its possession. Now, let us move forward by solving some examples –

Q.1. A batsman scores of 87 runs in the 17th match and thus increases his average by 3. Find his average after 17th match.

Sol. As mentioned earlier, assume 17 matches as seventeen people with equal runs, i.e. average. Now, by scoring 87 runs in 17th match, he increased his average by 3. So, 3 runs flow from the 17th person to all other 16 persons, i.e. a total of 16*3=48 runs from 17th person to other persons. Now, 17th person has 87-48=39 runs which is the average.

 

Q.2. Average weight of 10 people increased by 1.5 kg when one person of 45 kg is replaced by a new man. What is the weight of this new man?

Sol. One thing is clear from the question that the weight of the new person is more than 45 kg as his entry increases the average weight. Also, if the average, i.e. equal points of every person, increases it must flow from the new person. Now,the total extra weight that this man has brought with him is 1.5*10=15 kg. So,the weight of this new person is 15+45 = 60 kg.

 

Q.3. Average of five numbers is 27. If one number is excluded the average becomes 25. Find the excluded number.

Sol. Since exclusion of one number leads to a reduction in average, the number must be greater than the average, i.e. 27. Extra quantity this number takes away with it is 2 from each of the remaining four numbers as the average after exclusion is 25. So, total extra quantity taken away is 2*4=8. Hence, the number which was excluded is 8+27 = 35.

 

Q.4. Average of 10 matches is 32. How many runs should one score to increase his average by 4 runs?

Sol. To increase the average by 4, i.e. to make it 36, one should score (36 + 4*10) = 76 runs. Here, by scoring 76 runs in 11th match, one can give away 4 each to each of 10 other matches thereby increasing the average of 10 other matches to 36 and keeping 76-40= 36 for the 11th match.

 

Q.5. The average age of the mother and her six children is 12 years which is reduced by 5 years if the age of the mother is excluded. How old is the mother?

Sol. Before mother’s exclusion, the average age is 12 years. Mother’s exclusion takes away 5*6=30 years from the children. So, the age of the mother is 12+30= 42 years.

 

CLAT questions are generally similar to the above-given examples which can be quite easily solved without using any formula or pen-paper. Other types of questions, where you will be given numbers and asked to compute the average, it can be done by using the formula –

Sum of Quantities / Number of Quantities

For natural numbers, the average of n natural numbers is given by: (n+1)/2. (As sum of n natural numbers is n (n+1)/2).

Anil Bhadu

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Posted in English, Study Material

Cracking The Vocabulary Section

Vocabulary is a nightmare for most people as the English language seems to have an infinitely large number of words and seems to throw new ones at you every now and then. So, in this small write-up, I have attempted to give you a few tips which would help you ace the vocabulary section.

First and foremost, you should buy a decent book on English vocabulary and start going through it at the rate of about three pages a day. Yes, it might seem a bit intimidating at first, but you have to sweat it out. Underline the words that you didn’t know existed and try and use them in your day-to-day conversations in the right context. By the end of the month you should have ideally completed the book, and believe me you will start making more sense of the literary world around you, you will understand more of what the erudite journalist in “The Hindu” is trying to express and the world will seem so much better. Continue reading “Cracking The Vocabulary Section”

Posted in Logic, Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Reason Your Way Through CLAT

Dealing with the Logical Reasoning section

One thing I’ve often heard from people, who ask me for help with CLAT preparation, is that people with a science background have it easy when it comes to Logical Reasoning and Maths as they have ‘that bent of mind’ (but are woefully silent on what exactly they mean by that). I always try to dispel this misconception by giving them my example. I had humanities in school and I have always struggled with Maths, however, I have always been good at Logical Reasoning. So trust me when I say that you can make Logical Reasoning your strength no matter where you come from.

The Logical Reasoning section is fairly easy and can help you increase your score and boost your confidence. Since it accounts for one-fifth of the paper, it is advisable to devote around 25-30 minutes out of the two hours to this section. You should try and aim for thirty marks or more here which is not that difficult a target to achieve. According to me, there are three things any NLU-hopeful should keep in mind while attempting this section: speed, accuracy and the importance of reading the questions carefully.

Most of the questions in this section are in groups, based on the same problem, and therefore once you’ve solved the initial question in the group, it should not take you a lot of time to answer the consequent ones. Also to increase your speed without compromising on accuracy and efficiency, you can use certain techniques or quick tricks. One illustration of this could be EJOTY (5-10-15-20-25) which makes solving question based on alphabet series and coding-decoding easier and faster. You can either learn these tricks from some book, or study material, or create some on your own. Just make sure they are easy to remember and also to apply.

There is a huge variety of questions that can come in this section ranging from blood relations, coding-decoding, and syllogisms to critical reasoning. All of these require a lot of practice and clarity on the most efficient way of going about them. You only need to spend an hour or two each day on this section; practicing 6-7 questions of each type everyday should be more than sufficient to ensure that you perform well in this section. Daily practice will go a long way in helping you build your speed and increasing your accuracy.

One really important thing I noticed while looking at mock tests and CLAT papers was that the wording of the question is very important. Often people are in a hurry and do not read the questions carefully and thus lose out on precious marks. While answering questions based on syllogisms, it’s necessary to look at the options carefully and answer accordingly. This applies to other types of questions in this section as well.

All of this is, of course, my personal opinion, and there might be some people who disagree with me on the ‘ideal’ strategy for attempting the section, so feel free to make your own strategy. However, I cannot help but emphasise again on the need to build upon your speed and accuracy which is only possible through regular practice and a thorough understanding of the types of questions and their requirements. Apart from all this, all I can do is tell you that Logical Reasoning is quite scoring so don’t worry and just prepare well!

Aditi Gupta

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Posted in Get Inspired, Motivation, Study Material

CLAT: Your Wonderwall

I’m sure most of you must have heard Wonderwall by Oasis. Yes, it’s a popular song, but what does it have to do with CLAT? ‘Wonderwall’ means “the person you constantly find yourself thinking about”. And I’m going to tell you why CLAT should be your wonderwall.

Today is gonna be the day
That they’re gonna throw it back to you

There’s less than three months for the D-Day. Haven’t started preparing yet? Today is the day to start. Continue reading “CLAT: Your Wonderwall”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Balance Boards and CLAT!

Boards or CLAT? Both important, both time consuming – what and how much of it to study? Yes, it is that daunting time of CLAT preparation when your prep routine is falling apart, your focus is divided and you don’t know from where, when, why and WHAT to study – for Boards or for CLAT? It’s okay, relax, many of us have been there, done that, and successfully pulled off both Boards and CLAT. It needs a bit more hard work and dedication, but is definitely doable. And trust us, if we can do it, you can too! Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Balance Boards and CLAT!”

Posted in Motivation, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.

Ah yes, it’s that time of the year! It’s unbelievably satisfying to watch students struggle through the next few months with the burden of CLAT coupled with the additional burden of the Boards. Anyway, since sadistic pleasure is not the point of this article, let me move on to its main purpose.

It is around end-Feb as I’m writing this and if your CLAT preparation is in full swing, then that’s great. If not, you might want to start soon and with a bit of intensive preparation, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t crack it. As you’d know (and if you don’t, you probably should), the CLAT paper is divided into five sections consisting of English, General Knowledge, Math, Legal Reasoning and Logical Reasoning. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Try not to mess it up.”

Posted in Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.

First and foremost question before we get into details……. Are seating arrangement questions important for CLAT?

To this, the answer is a big ‘YES’.

In CLAT, reasoning is an extremely important section as it makes up twenty percent of the marks. But, it’s real importance lies in the fact that it’s extremely scoring. Amongst the myriad reasoning questions, seating arrangement questions are high scoring and less time consuming ones. Less time consuming as you will find three to five questions based on the same set of problem. Continue reading “Bust CLAT: Seating Arrangement Decoded.”