Posted in CLAT Mock Test Series, Mock Tests

A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!

Akash Deep Singh (AILET AIR 1) explains the enigma of Post-Mock Analysis

I am quite sure all of you would have heard this innumerable times from an uncountable number of people (exaggeration is not always a bad idea :P) that giving mocks is the best way to practice for CLAT. LawKey itself has been telling you the same thing. If I haven’t made it clear already, I am also a part of the same bandwagon and believe that mocks are the best practice you can get. Most of you have taken this advice seriously and are giving one mock a day. Continue reading “A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!”

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Posted in English, Study Material

Taming the Shrew: Attempting Reading Comprehension

In this article, Akash Deep Singh explains how to attempt reading comprehensions

One of the most common fear of most CLAT aspirants is the Reading-Comprehension(RC) question present in the paper. The innate resistance to this particular type of question is so large that many of you refuse to even attempt it. The usual laments being it takes too long to complete it, it’s highly subjective in nature and hence, it’s not worth the time or effort. You neglect it till the end and try to complete it in whatever time is left. This is a cardinal error that must be avoided at all costs. CLAT always has an RC question. It might be worth anything from 5-10 marks. And you cannot afford to neglect it.

Another common complaint which I have come across is it’s become difficult to attempt RC as its online now (for all we know, it might not stay so anymore but that’s not up to you). Test-takers not being able to mark the important portions of the passage anymore is a common problem. What needs to be remembered is that this is true for everyone. Being able to mark the important portions was just a helpful tool. The most important thing then and even now is to understand the underlying idea of the passage.

CLAT has never given hard RCs. The ideal time in which an RC question should be completed is 7-8 minutes. To do this, it is near-essential that you have a fast reading speed. We have already published an article on that. Please follow the suggestions given there as they will help you immeasurably not only in RC or English but through the whole paper.

Different people have different ways to attempt and ace this question. It’s up to you to practice them all out and find the sweet spot. You can employ the method I’ve given below or some modification of the same as per your convenience. So here goes:

 Take a minute to read the first few lines of each para in the passage to understand the gist of it. You will need to completely read the first para and also the concluding lines of the passage. Now read the questions, not the options, only the questions. This will give you an idea of what you are looking for in the passage. If there are too many questions, then only read the first few. Otherwise there’s a chance you might get muddled up. Go back to the passage and take 3-4 minutes to read it completely. You must have gotten the gist of it by now. This is when start attempting the questions. If you were not able to read all of the questions, you can now attempt them as you have already read the passage. You will have to refer to the passage again and again but if you have gotten the gist of it, then this back and forth becomes negligible. Another way to go about it is to first read the questions and then the passage. This gives you a hint of what you need to be on the lookout for.

Please bear in mind that none of the suggestions given above might suit you. But you can only find this out by attempting as many RC questions as possible and trying out the above strategy (or any other you may have stumbled upon in the course of your preparation) to figure out what best suits you.

-Akash Deep Singh

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Posted in Mathematics, Study Material

Averages: A Complete Guide

Averages is an extremely important section for CLAT. Most of you have already completed this topic as it is one of the easiest topics in Maths. However, there still might be some people who have not done it. I expect this article to be useful for both the groups.

Almost every one of us is quite familiar with this primary class formula for determining Average, i.e. Sum of quantities / Number of quantities. But to use this formula you need a pen and a paper. Jotting down the numbers given in the question and then trying to solve them will unnecessarily take up your time. Therefore, in this article, I’ll try to explain how to solve most of the questions related to averages asked in CLAT (there still will be some questions which will require a pen and a paper) without using pen and paper or the above-given formula and save your ‘precious’ time. So, let us start:

While solving questions on averages, keep one thing in mind, i.e. assume the average of quantities as quantities in possession of equal points. For example, if it is given that average of 10 quantities is 15, assume that there are 10 people/things each having 15 points in its possession. Now, let us move forward by solving some examples –

Q.1. A batsman scores of 87 runs in the 17th match and thus increases his average by 3. Find his average after 17th match.

Sol. As mentioned earlier, assume 17 matches as seventeen people with equal runs, i.e. average. Now, by scoring 87 runs in 17th match, he increased his average by 3. So, 3 runs flow from the 17th person to all other 16 persons, i.e. a total of 16*3=48 runs from 17th person to other persons. Now, 17th person has 87-48=39 runs which is the average.

 

Q.2. Average weight of 10 people increased by 1.5 kg when one person of 45 kg is replaced by a new man. What is the weight of this new man?

Sol. One thing is clear from the question that the weight of the new person is more than 45 kg as his entry increases the average weight. Also, if the average, i.e. equal points of every person, increases it must flow from the new person. Now,the total extra weight that this man has brought with him is 1.5*10=15 kg. So,the weight of this new person is 15+45 = 60 kg.

 

Q.3. Average of five numbers is 27. If one number is excluded the average becomes 25. Find the excluded number.

Sol. Since exclusion of one number leads to a reduction in average, the number must be greater than the average, i.e. 27. Extra quantity this number takes away with it is 2 from each of the remaining four numbers as the average after exclusion is 25. So, total extra quantity taken away is 2*4=8. Hence, the number which was excluded is 8+27 = 35.

 

Q.4. Average of 10 matches is 32. How many runs should one score to increase his average by 4 runs?

Sol. To increase the average by 4, i.e. to make it 36, one should score (36 + 4*10) = 76 runs. Here, by scoring 76 runs in 11th match, one can give away 4 each to each of 10 other matches thereby increasing the average of 10 other matches to 36 and keeping 76-40= 36 for the 11th match.

 

Q.5. The average age of the mother and her six children is 12 years which is reduced by 5 years if the age of the mother is excluded. How old is the mother?

Sol. Before mother’s exclusion, the average age is 12 years. Mother’s exclusion takes away 5*6=30 years from the children. So, the age of the mother is 12+30= 42 years.

 

CLAT questions are generally similar to the above-given examples which can be quite easily solved without using any formula or pen-paper. Other types of questions, where you will be given numbers and asked to compute the average, it can be done by using the formula –

Sum of Quantities / Number of Quantities

For natural numbers, the average of n natural numbers is given by: (n+1)/2. (As sum of n natural numbers is n (n+1)/2).

Anil Bhadu

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Posted in English, Study Material

Cracking The Vocabulary Section

Vocabulary is a nightmare for most people as the English language seems to have an infinitely large number of words and seems to throw new ones at you every now and then. So, in this small write-up, I have attempted to give you a few tips which would help you ace the vocabulary section.

First and foremost, you should buy a decent book on English vocabulary and start going through it at the rate of about three pages a day. Yes, it might seem a bit intimidating at first, but you have to sweat it out. Underline the words that you didn’t know existed and try and use them in your day-to-day conversations in the right context. By the end of the month you should have ideally completed the book, and believe me you will start making more sense of the literary world around you, you will understand more of what the erudite journalist in “The Hindu” is trying to express and the world will seem so much better. Continue reading “Cracking The Vocabulary Section”

Posted in CLAT Mock Test Series, Mock Tests

A Mock a Day Keeps Fear at Bay? NOT!

Akash Deep Singh (AILET AIR 1) explains the enigma of Post-Mock Analysis

I am quite sure all of you would have heard this innumerable times from an uncountable number of people (exaggeration is not always a bad idea :P) that giving mocks is the best way to practice for CLAT. LawKey itself has been telling you the same thing. If I haven’t made it clear already, I am also a part of the same bandwagon and believe that mocks are the best practice you can get. Most of you have taken this advice seriously and are giving one mock a day. A mock a day is easy to manage and it leaves you with enough time to keep on working on your weaker subjects. But, please bear in mind you can cut down to 4-5 mocks a week, if it gets exhausting for you. Your mind needs to be fresh before you attempt any mock, otherwise it’s of no use. If you are still in class 12th and worried about not being able to practice mocks. STOP. Boards are the most important thing in your life right now and you have to pay complete attention to them. You can get back to CLAT when boards end, people at NLS and other NLUs have managed to crack CLAT while studying in 12th, you can do it too! You have been preparing for CLAT and as earlier articles on the page have already said believe in that preparation. This is true for any CLAT 2016 aspirant.

But as you have already noticed, this article isn’t (solely!) about keeping you guys motivated or exhorting you to do more mocks. It is about what to do after you have given a mock. Trust me, and more importantly my experience, when I say that analysis is more important than increasing the number of mocks you have attempted. A person who has practiced only 3-4 mocks a week but has analysed them to gauge his strength and weaknesses and has used the time available to him to work on them, has a much better chance of getting in than someone who gave 3 mocks a day but didn’t stop to analyse them.

It is after you have finished your mock when the real work starts. Mock analysis proceeds at two levels. The immediate one happens just after you have given the mock, which you should ideally do on the same day or the next day. The second approach is to be done with a homogenized set of mocks, by which I am referring to test series released by one single institute, and then analyze it in entirety. I will come back to the second approach later.

The immediate analysis entails looking at every question that you were not able to attempt or those questions you got wrong. Plan how you are going to address each one of them over the next few days. Analyse how much time you took per question. Is there a particular section that you are giving too much time to? Work on setting a time limit for each section and try to adhere to this time limit. Pay particular attention to the time taken by you on incorrect questions. Did you genuinely believe you could solve that question or were you stubborn enough to not move on? These are some of the things that you have to keep in mind while analysing your mocks.

The second approach, and I urge you to follow this at all costs, is to be done with a homogenized set of mocks. Coaching institutes who release these mocks provide you with an answer key unlike myriad other mocks that you will practice. This is an additional reason why the second approach to analyse your mocks must be followed. Also as it is online, you can observe the time taken by you in different questions. Most of the mocks in a test series are of the same level. The difficulty level sometimes goes up or down but that’s also to prepare you better. It’s CLAT, anything can happen. Take 3-4 of your past mocks and go through each of them section wise. You will notice that you are getting a certain type of question wrong again and again. Today’s the day when you will practice them till you get them right. Then move on to the questions which you were able to answer correctly. How much time did you take in them? Learn the tips and tricks to reduce this time. You are going through the paper to recognize the patterns present in your mocks and believe me, they are there. A particular type of question that you are always getting wrong, questions which you spend a lot of time on but do get it right, eventually.

Also you will have tried out different strategies in these mocks and this is an opportunity to check which one suits you. Use the most beneficial one in the next mock. It might not be the perfect one for you but you have time till March end to discover your perfect strategy. After that you have more or less decided on your approach and now you are working on fine-tuning it.

In the end I would like to reiterate, practicing a mock is doing half the job. Until you analyse your mocks, you are getting no benefit out of practicing so many mocks.

All the best.

Akash Deep Singh

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Posted in Logic, Logical Reasoning, Study Material

Reason Your Way Through CLAT

Dealing with the Logical Reasoning section

One thing I’ve often heard from people, who ask me for help with CLAT preparation, is that people with a science background have it easy when it comes to Logical Reasoning and Maths as they have ‘that bent of mind’ (but are woefully silent on what exactly they mean by that). I always try to dispel this misconception by giving them my example. I had humanities in school and I have always struggled with Maths, however, I have always been good at Logical Reasoning. So trust me when I say that you can make Logical Reasoning your strength no matter where you come from.

The Logical Reasoning section is fairly easy and can help you increase your score and boost your confidence. Since it accounts for one-fifth of the paper, it is advisable to devote around 25-30 minutes out of the two hours to this section. You should try and aim for thirty marks or more here which is not that difficult a target to achieve. According to me, there are three things any NLU-hopeful should keep in mind while attempting this section: speed, accuracy and the importance of reading the questions carefully.

Most of the questions in this section are in groups, based on the same problem, and therefore once you’ve solved the initial question in the group, it should not take you a lot of time to answer the consequent ones. Also to increase your speed without compromising on accuracy and efficiency, you can use certain techniques or quick tricks. One illustration of this could be EJOTY (5-10-15-20-25) which makes solving question based on alphabet series and coding-decoding easier and faster. You can either learn these tricks from some book, or study material, or create some on your own. Just make sure they are easy to remember and also to apply.

There is a huge variety of questions that can come in this section ranging from blood relations, coding-decoding, and syllogisms to critical reasoning. All of these require a lot of practice and clarity on the most efficient way of going about them. You only need to spend an hour or two each day on this section; practicing 6-7 questions of each type everyday should be more than sufficient to ensure that you perform well in this section. Daily practice will go a long way in helping you build your speed and increasing your accuracy.

One really important thing I noticed while looking at mock tests and CLAT papers was that the wording of the question is very important. Often people are in a hurry and do not read the questions carefully and thus lose out on precious marks. While answering questions based on syllogisms, it’s necessary to look at the options carefully and answer accordingly. This applies to other types of questions in this section as well.

All of this is, of course, my personal opinion, and there might be some people who disagree with me on the ‘ideal’ strategy for attempting the section, so feel free to make your own strategy. However, I cannot help but emphasise again on the need to build upon your speed and accuracy which is only possible through regular practice and a thorough understanding of the types of questions and their requirements. Apart from all this, all I can do is tell you that Logical Reasoning is quite scoring so don’t worry and just prepare well!

Aditi Gupta

Follow us and ensure that you do not miss a single post. Like our Facebook Page as well and help us grow. If you have any queries, message us on Facebook or write to us at lawkeyforclat@gmail.com. To increase your chances of making it to the top 3 NLUs through CLAT’17, click here

Posted in CLAT Mentorship, CLAT Mock Test Series, Study Material

CLAT Mentorship Programme

Hey all,

CLAT 2017 is done – the exam was conducted, the results are out, the colleges have been allotted. We were delighted to see that our students secured an excellent result. Arti Gupta, our mentee kid, secured AIR 8 in CLAT 2017. In addition to that, our students – Ananya H.S.  (AIR 11), Vishu Surana (AIR 13), Yusuf Tariq (AIR 23), Mohit Kumar (AIR 41) and Harshvardhan Tripathi (AILET AIR 3, CLAT AIR 118) – secured excellent ranks. We are fortunate to have had such an excellent result in only a few months of operation. It makes us believe that we have been helpful to you and your CLAT preparation. But CLAT 2017 is long gone now. It’s time to look ahead to CLAT 2018! Many of you are now at the same stage that we were a couple of years ago. The mental state you are in is something we can completely pressure, it is completely natural to feel this way during CLAT preparation. It is what prepares you for taking the exam. After all, keeping your cool is what CLAT is all about.

Continue reading “CLAT Mentorship Programme”